Skip to main content

About your Search

Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
the rabbi talk about what i was doing, i said i was mayor of a city of newark. he said, i want to talk to you about the city of jerusalem. i thought we would talk about current events and foreign policy. he said, i want to talk to about the city of jerusalem in the year 66. he said, the year 66, titus and the romans laid siege to the city of jerusalem. the city of jerusalem would not relent. years and years passed by. finally, up one person told him that if you want to take the city, you need to wait and be patient. inside the city, there is a problem. that problem will grow into a cancer and that cancer will eat away the very core of that community. if you know your history, what happened around the year 70 is the divisions within the city of jerusalem amongst the zealots and others became so significant that it weakened the city from inside. the rabbi told me that the city of jerusalem was taken in the year 70 by titus. he looked at me for a long time and i looked at him. he said, what is the moral of the story? i said, make sure there are no zealots in newark. [laughter] he said no.
as for the city of new york, the state and the nation. i'm proud that we have been joined by several distinguished members of the congressional black caucus, which for more than four decades has been known as the conscience of the congress. and in that capacity, the congressional black caucus has year after year spent time trying to perfect our democracy and create a more perfect union. we confront that moment right now here in this great country of ours as we try and figure out how we deal with creating a pathway towards citizenship for the more than 11 million undocumented immigrants who are forced to toil in the shadow. we have been joined today as co-anchor for this next hour, distinguished classmate of mine from the great state of nevada, mr. horsford, who had the opportunity to be present while president obama delivered his remarks as it relates to immigration reform. and so i would like to ask mr. horsford if he might comment on the president's remarks and weigh in on the immigration debate from his perspective as a representative from an important state in nevada. mr. horsford: thank you,
at the unemployed host: this was advanced by an act from the new york city council. what did it say? guest: the new york city council passed legislation to make it illegal to refuse to consider somebody for a job solely because they are unemployed. it does not mandate that employers must hire unemployed people. it does not even mandate that employers must interview unemployed people what it does say is that the status of being unemployed in and of itself is not a disqualifying job characteristic. it is not something that an employer could use to say she is not working so put her aside. it requires employers to consider all qualified applicants on a fair basis. host: if a person felt they were discriminated against, how could they prove it? guest: there is lots of concern about trial lawyers and lawsuits. people are going to need evidence. they will need to that job ad has line was that either explicitly or implicitly makes it clear that the unemployed are not welcome. they would need statements either from hiring professionals, people somewhere in the process, a lot of workers have called us over t
" was started by 68 kids in oklahoma city. they had decided they had enough. they were not going to put up with this kind of thing happening anymore in their world without them doing everything they could to make it stop. i have met every single one of those 68 kids. do you know what they taught me? they come from all walks of life. there are red, yellow, black, and white. they all have one thing in common. they all treat each other with love and respect. do you know what that tells me? that tells me that this is a doable thing. it's doable. if those 68 kids from somebody different backgrounds can learn to love and respect each other, help each other out, humans can learn that. it is doable. we have to learn to respect ourselves, don't we? i am not going to stand up here and tell you you have to try to like everybody. not everybody is going to like you. all i'm trying to say is we all have the right just to be here. every single one of us has the right just to be who we are. laura and i, we have been to 605 schools in the past year and a half. we have gone as far as australia. we have talk
traffic control towers and smaller cities. lawmakers have until march 1 until automatic spending cuts -- spending cuts are expected to take effect. this is a little less than an hour. >> i remember all of you from roll call. [laughter]you asked me all the3se dumb questions. [laughter] >> i just want to say that it is my pleasure, and clearly yours, to have with me today the secretary of transportation, ray lahood, who is here to speak with you about the impacts of sequester, if it comes to pass, on the american travel industry. and as we've talked about a lot, the indiscriminate, deep cuts will affect everyone, really, in america, and industries. and secretary lahood is here to discuss one aspect of that with you and to take some questions. and afterwards, i'll be here to take questions on other issues. i just want to remind you that we're on a slightly constrained time schedule. we have the president's meeting with national governors -- democratic governors, and then also the pool spray with the prime minister of japan. with that, i turn it over to secretary lahood. >> sequester will
's an on for to welcome president obama home. like every major city, chicago faces two challenges, the strength of our school and the safety of our streets. our streets will only be as safe as our schools are strong, and our families are sound. after decades of debate, our children now have a full school day and a full school year, equal to the measure of their potential. we have created five new high schools, partnered with major tech companies, to educate students. all the way to a community college degree and focus on science and technology and math and engineering. just like the one the president mentioned in new york, in his state of the union address. new york has one, chicago has five, but who's counting? the reforms we have brought to early childhood education and our community colleges and our college to career program, aligned with the president's agenda as he laid it out in the state of the union address. for our children, to live up to their potential, we have to live up to our obligations to them with greater investment in after-school programs, job training, as well as mentoring programs
of poverty in the next decade alone. city kids are going back to work. farmers are having their own online dating service. the most talked about super bowl commercial, courtesy of the late harvey, was a heartwarming tribute to the american farmer. what is that kenny chesney song? "she thinks my tractor is sexy"? there is some truth to that. agricultural issues are, if not sexy, increasingly important. i'm glad to be here. it is appropriate that we are here today. it turns out that it was february 21, 1865 -- 148 years ago today, that the u.s. patent office issued a patent. i will not give you a pop quiz. it was labeled john deere plow. the implement sketched out could have easily been labeled one of the most important inventions in history. they called it the plow that broke the plains, and it did. by replacing cast iron with smooth innovation, it opened up swaths of land for cultivation. it made it possible for my hometown to exist. beforehand, tilling an acre took a full 24 hours. afterward, as little as five. every toil ended another assumption of what the land could produce. it is not
the way back to oklahoma city. it is chronically untreated mental illness. our services go beyond that. you look at the reaction from the strategies, either gun control or -- a false sense of security. the real issue is people who have not been treated, in many cases, known to family and friends, but have not received the treatment they need to not get into extreme situations. >> you do not go over the nra line, putting armed guards and schools? >> just banning a certain firearm would not stop that. there are multiple ways to get it. just arming a bunch of people would not do that, either. someone could be armed on the other side of the school, that does not protect. none of these are 100% full proof. the only risk, get up with the problem is. stop before people even get to that point. that is the one denominator -- i remember before we had the tragedy at the sikh temple, there was a good job done in reacting to what happened in aurora. families seeking to protect and try to heal, then trying -- ultimately what you have to do is find out what could have been done to prevent this. it is
. >> a colleague who runs one of these community technology labs and parcel on it just became a city architect and is now planning the city. 50% use unemployment, their economy is trashed. no opportunities, yet ships come in made with products from china and get put in the dump. there filling the city with digital fabrication labs. it is a globally connected for knowledge. they are bringing back into the city skills and jobs that were far away. any one of those products, the incremental timer doesn't compete with the factory. one is if everything make is different. if you change the supply chain so it is local, and one is if you value the role of local production in the economy. all of those things are leading to this sort of infrastructure as a key part of urban planning. >> this whole maker movement, there is something like you're talking about that established in detroit. those are wonderful things and you played an important role in supporting those of the white house. i'm not saying it's not real or important, it's just not going to be the savior we are talking about where we need another
the most of the guns had rested because the government of the city of new orleans did not give a never mind and left the guns in an exposed condition and in rather extreme humidity that they experience there, so the guns or ruined. oh, too bad. host: what statement did gun owners of america make after sandy hook? guest: following sandy hook, gun owners of america was pretty outraged. we pointed out that the politicians have to accept some blame for what happened, for having facilitated what happened in sandy hook. all of the mass murders in our country in the last 20 years with one exception have occurred in legally-required gun-free zones. these are places where you just are not allowed to legally have a gun. and whether it was a mall in utah, whether it was a theater in colorado, or whether it was at this school -- typically it has been at schools, that is where these mass murders occurred. our response that was let's get rid of the laws that require people to be disarmed, precisely in places where the mass murders have occurred. host: harrison, nebraska, good morning. caller: hello, the
office. he grew up in lake city, calif., population less than 100. we welcome his family, including mom and dad, tisch and gary. i hope you do not mind that we share that he was actually born at home. these days, clinton works in the oilfields of north dakota. he is a man of faith. and after more than a decade in uniform, he says the thing he looks forward to the most is just being a husband and father. in fact, this is not even the biggest event for clinton this week. because tomorrow, he and his wife, tammy, will celebrate their 13th wedding anniversary. this is probably not the intimate kind of anniversary you -- planned. [laughter] arewe're so glad that you here, along with your three children. colin is not as shy as clinton. [laughter] he was racing around the oval office pretty good. and he sampled a number of the apples before he found the [laughter] -- the one that was just right. [laughter] to truly understand the act -- the extraordinary actions for which clinton is being honored, you need to understand the almost unbelievable conditions under which he and his troops serve. --
to another and that is the kind of flexibility -- when you see this states and your counties and cities do that across the board -- spending reductions generally, they do it with flexibility to the different departments can re reprogrammed-and replace and adjusted. that's the way it should be. host: from twitter -- guest: the keystone xl pipeline is a good point. it has been awhile since the president has delayed a decision on keystone. as bipartisan support and the governor of nebraska has said let's get this rolling and keystone is a great idea. that would be a great first start. permitting some oil exploration and drilling and development is another one in that same sector. you can look at what has happened in north dakota with the amount of drilling and production. another thing the president could do today that would lead to job growth is look at his federal agencies. the federal regulatory agencies have 291,000 employees. 291,000 employees. last year, they issued 4000 new regulations which are thousands of pages of instructions and the federal register. that -- he needs to for -- it
. philadelphia, pittsburgh, washington, d.c., tampa, portland, and kansas city. going to need folks who are scared about finding out their numbers. we'll have to have them trust us. >> your neighbor in need. >> i have been neglecting my health. all coming together to face their fears. when the day was over, 1000 people met with the doctor. taking charge of their health. these programs have been successful and i want to point out that almost everyone has insurance. i'm sorry, they have jobs. many times, they do not have insurance. in 15 minutes, it takes five members -- five minutes to give you the numbers. for the rest of your life, you know lot more about the major drivers of longevity. their simple, elegant, and seamless. this is the amount of total tobacco that we use in this country. this is something many of the struggle with. this is how i talk about lung disease. when you tell a smoker to stop smoking, the reason it fails is because he reminding them how incompetent they are. you are reminding them how they don't embarrass themselves. people who smoke got addicted and they weren'
students across this country and in the city of chicago walk out and they see the promise of downtown, do they see their future as part of that opportunity or do they see a different future? and that is how we measure success. the two places where we can bridge that gap between where our kids are today and the promise of this city and the promise that this city holds are in the classroom and in the home. president obama understands that to connect all americans to that vision of a promising future requires that we create real ladders of opportunity. i am pleased he has come home to expand on that vision. ladies and gentlemen, let's give the president a chicago welcome. [playing "hail to the chief"] [applause] >> hey, chicago. hello, chicago. hello, everybody. hello, hyde park. [cheers] it is good to be home. it is good to be home. everybody have a seat, y'all relax. it's just me. y'all know me. it is good to be back home. a couple of people i want to acknowledge -- first of all, i want to thank your mayor, my great friend rahm emanuel for his outstanding leadership of the city and this ki
in target city. i looked to my government to protect me in times of natural disasters and terrorist attack. is it ok to look to them for that. >> of course. you hear about sequestration. gina will help to create that is the president of the united states. he is -- do you know who helped create that? the president of the united states. the sequestration would consume about 2.2% of our annual spending. 2.4% maybe. two point something. all of these issues that the police force will be laid out and all of the hospitals will close, that is crock. there will be spending cuts are the wrong kind of spending cuts and some places. there might be too many spending cuts in the defense department. let's get something straight. we are not talking about robbing a bank. we are talking about 10 years. sequestration will not last a month. the next thing that comes up at the end of the month is the issue of getting a federal budget. what the administration wants to do is force republicans to close the government. they believe that will help them win the house in 2014. the republicans better get their story w
a few years ago i found myself sitting next to the mayor of salt lake city and he was a nice guy and we started talking about what i do for a living and i told him i work to encourage young women and girls to run for a political office. why, he said? which stumps me because in my world, the question of why we need more women, is not a question but how do we get more women there. he went on to say i have two daughters, i have a wife, i have a more, he said, i know what women need and what can women do in office that i can't do? and it was an interesting question and he had no idea what a can of worms he was opening by getting into this conversation with me because i really believe no matter how well intentioned a man in office is, his decisions are never going to be as strong if you have men and women legislating together. i'm happy to say in the years i started doing this work is the world has come around to this idea, the idea is we need to add women to leadership, not because it's fair or it's the right thing to do but because adding more women to leadership is going to make stronger
city. we have got to be more comfortable in talking to people about what works. what is working that other countries are doing. the diversity of the representation in the house will be helpful for that. i think also we have to learn something from how historically brave actions by your predecessors in this caucus played out in the electorate. when were they rewarded? when were they punished? and later rewarded? i cannot tell you how many nights in the white house, every single night before i went to bed, for months and months and months after the 1994 election, i thought about the people who were defeated because they voted for the economic program, because they voted for the assault weapons ban. i knew exactly what happened. i thought a lot about those who survived and why they did. as you look ahead and you decide, what are we going to do about the budget, what are we going to do about having the democrats branded as the party of jobs and innovation for the future? make no mistake about it, the republicans will try very hard not to make it as easy for you to win by-reference.
. many of the cities and counties in my district now have single member election districts ordered by the courts. the courts have required that some of these districts have a majority african-american district which now eneable the african-american community to elect candidates of their choice. eliminate -- elimination of section 5 could enable mischievous jurisdictions to eliminate district elections in favor of at-large elections where consen trages of black voters would be absorbed into at-large areas. the time has now come when we should eliminate the protection of section 5. the evidence continues to suggest racially polarized voting that discriminates against the african-american community. if this protection is struck down, some governing boards at the state and local level will seize the opportunity to promulgate election rules that discrang -- disadvantage minority voters and the only remedy then will be to file an expensive federal lawsuit and prove intentional discrimination in the district court. so, mr. speaker, i urge the supreme court to carefully look at the legisla
costing them a lot of money. in new york, it is more about the city of new york than the state of new york. the smoking bans which did not help -- did not hurt businesses. when everybody knew the rules, all the bad restaurants shifted over. -- all the restaurants shifted over. this allows a more sophisticated way of dealing with the socialized costs so will we can share them more easily. if you create rules that everyone can follow, they will all do the right thing. otherwise, people will cherry pick and profits accordingly. i personally think each state will have to find their own way of going on this path. it is worth putting this in a document. asked mike bloomberg if this is good or bad. if we're talking about the impact of sodas comment that was worth the risk politically to get that conversation going. there are many other states. fantastic improvement in some of the major urban areas like philadelphia. when you look at this places, they are simple things done well. real food, social infrastructure, mich.-as its 4x4 tool. what little to do all of view, it ought to be about second opi
of the largest cities and in some smaller independent operators in smaller cities. a good part of the traffic has been people who stream it online, and that is a pretty dedicated following. in fact, with the very large online content, a good percentage of that comes from the united states. there is an appetite, clearly. how much of that will translate to a cable channel again where some of these folks are dedicated online streamers' is a challenge, but we hope we can provide interesting and freshen up content and have some people cross over. host: how will the recent purchase expand the american audience? who will you be able to reach now? >> -- guest: it is an estimated 50 million viewers. obviously it is a great leap forward and a great deal. one of the things we fought for years was distribution in the americas. this just opens some eyeballs to us, and we hope it will give people a chance to see our coverage, to sample it for those who have not seen it, and again, provide a platform for the core audience we already have. host: it is a 24-hour global news network carried in places like new york
to school. that did not happen in new york city. that is a different culture. that is what bill clinton was warning barack obama about. be careful because these people really care about their culture and their life and what they do. they care about different things than you do. part of it is cultural. when you ask somebody, or one of your leaders, you ask about the nra, we are viewed as an advocacy organization that stands up for gun owners and the second amendment. that is about 12%. the rest goes to competition, a gun safety, technical information, and a lot of our research goes into boy scouts, girl scout, bringing people into the shooting sport and teaching them to handle guns safely. there are fewer gun accidents today than there were at the beginning of the 20th century but there are a lot more guns. the only people out there teaching gun safety and training people is the national rifle association. i have got to go. [laughter] i have to go but i will take you to a gun show. [captioning performed by the national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite co
are doing at least once a month in major cities and some secondary markets, ann arbor, austin, places where there are a lot of people interested in the type of journalism we do. whether or not that will be enough is an open question pri is certainly part of the trend where journalists are not just researching and writing. they are researching, writing, promoting, engaging in dialogue, and being important participants in events and interacting with their readers. other brands in our field have moved on to cafes, retail, particularly monocle, 20% of their revenue comes from their stores, which they have dozens of around the world. and there are still other ideas. from mice -- from my perspective, an era where they -- where there were sizable profits in this industry is over. the second part of the 20th century. we now have to adapt to a different kind of business. it is a double bottom line business. that is the right way to think about it. we have a mission that is important to the world. at the same time, we have a profit mission. we have to find some business model which will return us to
're they organized into hierarchies? for example, you need to know wisconsin is a state in their cities from there. if i say i like wisconsin, there are a whole bunch of interests that cascade off of that. you need to understand the hierarchy of objects. you also need to be able to understand how they relate to each other, synonyms, duplication. >> does this personalization large internet companies has you have to understand what the ontology of entities is. does that create a new paradigm? the most recent thing that any of the large internet companies have come out with is this social search that facebook has introduced. it is that a stepping stone? >> there is the social graph. what i am talking about, it will give way to the interest graph. you know this set of things i am interested in, you know the other set of things other people are interested in. they aren't just based on, did they go to the same school, do they work in the same place, they are based on, are they interested in the same things? we can create personalization technologies because you can see what people are doing and provide
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)